My 5 Step Process for Revising My NaNoWriMo Manuscript

Posted by: Shannon Moreau on Feb 26 2015, 6:54 pm in ,

or, I’m Pretty Sure I Don’t Know What the Hell I’m Doing

 

  1. Realize I’ve spent too much time marathoning Masters of Sex and pull out manuscript to re-read for the first time. Think, “Huh. This sounded so much better when I was writing it.” Nod off and go to bed.
  1. Ignore manuscript for two weeks and read books about one night stands instead.
  1. Receive encouraging messages from NaNoWriMo and start over, with a notebook, a red pen, and two or three shots of Vodka.

Read Write Bliss NaNoWriMo Manu

  1. Make notes to myself like, “Develop this or drop it” and “Must figure out S & R’s relationship” and “What is the issue here?”
  1. Occasionally, once in a while, every so often, note, “Huh. That’s pretty good. I don’t remember writing it. Not at all.”

Originally posted February 2, 2015, on Shannon Yvonne Moreau’s blog, Read Write Bliss.

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5 Writerly Things to Do in 2015

Posted by: Shannon Moreau on Jan 31 2015, 6:59 pm in

or, 5 Things I, the Writer, Will Probably Do This Year. At Least, I Should Do Them.

My cat thinks he is going to help me look up recipes in a cookbook. That's nothing new.

My cat thinks he is going to help me look up recipes in a cookbook. That’s nothing new.

My friend T sent me a HuffPo article that lists 52 new things writers can try for 2015. So many of the items were such great ideas that I found it kind of overwhelming. So I picked just 5 things that I will definitely think about/try/do in 2015.

Participate in NaNoWriMo in November 2015.

I had such a great time participating in my first NaNoWriMo last November that I am going to do it again this year. If I hustle on my rewrites sufficiently, maybe I’ll be scribbling out the first draft of a sequel.

Map a book you love.

Already happening. I’m trying to figure out where the heck I went so wrong on overwriting my first novel. Right now I’m mapping Jane Eyre, since the structure of that book has influenced how I view my heroines’ journeys. I’m also appreciating that while the recent movie adaptation was a decent effort, it never captured the magic and wit that is Jane and Rochester.

Read your work out loud.

Last year, I had actually seriously considered participating in my local DimeStories literary open mic night—before the holiday crunch set in, that is. It would be a good way to practice my public speaking. Eep. Hyperventilating. Like I said, I’ll think about it.

Do a literary pilgrimage to see a site where a favorite author lived or wrote about.

Now this is synchronicity. I just read an article in the paper about the D.H. Lawrence house in Taos reopening. This summer—day trip!

Set up a separate bank account for your writing pursuits.

Yep. As soon as I start making money from my writing, I’ll get right on that.

Originally posted January 12, 2015, on Shannon Yvonne Moreau’s blog, Read Write Bliss.

 

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Writing is a craft

Posted by: faaiken on May 18 2013, 6:07 pm in ,

The Craft of Writing
(Second post of The Business of Writing Series)
By F. A. Aiken

When asked during a televised interview “What is writing?” Shea Barkley answered “Writing is perfecting the craft.” I liked that answer. Writing is a craft. In the middle ages and the Renaissance, people learned their trade and craft through craft guilds. Someone wanting to enter the professional first must find a master craftsman willing to train him in the techniques of the profession by becoming the Master’s Apprentice. Here, the young person will be trained in the techniques of the craft, given instruction and opportunities to hone his skills and learn the rules of the trade or craft. After years of gaining and honing this knowledge, the apprentice becomes a journeyman, also called a fellow craft (fellow of the craft), being able to perform the trade without supervision. After years of work, he would submit his masterpiece to the guild and hopefully be accepted as a master of the craft, thereby being able to take on apprentices to train in the art of the craft. As the work of the master craftsman continue to gain fame, his peers would bestow upon the master the title of grandmaster.

At each stage of his tenure in the craft, the individual continues to increase his or her knowledge through learning how to apply the rules and knowledge gained to produce products of value through hard work and constant practice. At each stage, the rules are different and are necessary to increase the quality of the work. As an entered apprentice, the writer needs to learn about proper manuscript style, fundamentals of copy rights, proper use of grammar, the structure of the story, how to plot, etc. Once the writer masters these basics and advances to be a journeyman or fellow of the craft (fellow craft), the writer is taught more advanced material, such as the rules of revision, marketing techniques and other business fundamentals required of a person making money from the trade. Once the writer has increased his or her knowledge and skill levels through practice, some of the earlier rules no longer apply as they have become internalized into the writers being and are done automatically in the writing process. So the secret to advancement within the craft is practice, practice, practice. A couple of decades ago, Volkswagen featured an advertising campaign using a German work that translated into English as “continuous, never ending improvement”. And this is what the writer must strive to do with his writing. How can a writer improve? Through practice! So what is the definition of practice for a writer? Sitting at the keyboard, butt glued to the chair, fingers pounding on the keys forming words letter by letter into recognizable sentences that tell a story, minute by minute until the session is over. Each story, each scene, each sentence is practice. Learning for a writer is a lifelong endeavor with the single goal of never ending improvement in his story telling techniques. The writer is a lifelong learner. Remember, Writing is a Business and the writer’s desire is to succeed in this business by mastering the craft of writing. In the words of Dean Wesley Smith, the writer only needs to focus on the next sentence.

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Holiday Time is Movie Time

Posted by: Kari Bovee on Dec 23 2012, 2:00 am in , , , ,

It’s Christmas and Holiday time yet once again! It’s time for parties, goodies, friends and much merrymaking. It’s also the time of year when the newest movies hit the silver screen. 

I haven’t had too much time to visit the theater, but I did get to see Anna Karenina and Lincoln. While Anna Karenina had me tilting my head in wonderment at the theatrical interpretation of Tolstoy’s novel, Lincoln had me laughing, crying, mad and happy, all at the same time. Exactly what a good movie is supposed to do.  In my opinion, what makes a movie spectacular is not only the cinematography, editing and acting, but mostly THE WRITING. A good movie inspires me to learn more about my craft and become a better writer. I am going to share with you five of the movies that have made me want to write the next best-selling novel (with movie rights!)

#5 The Man in the Iron Mask (1998) starring Leonardo di Caprio, Jeremy Irons, John Malkovich, Gabriel Byrne and Gerard Depardieu.

Aside from the awesomeness of the cast, this version is huge due to its being a conglomeration of Alexandre Dumas’ D’Artangnan Romances and The Vicomte de Bragelonne, the 1929 film version starring Douglas Fairbanks, and the 1939 film version directed by James Whale.

Although the movie diverges a bit from historical accuracy, it is still a riveting story about the militaristic and cruel King Louis XIV and his sweet-tempered twin brother Phillip.  When they are born, the twins’ father sends Phillip away to save France from dynastic warfare. For 21 years, he has been hidden from the world and must wear an iron mask to protect his identity. When Louis comes to power, retired and aging muskateers, Athos, Porthos, Aramis and D’Artagnan devise a plan to replace the despotic Louis with the more benevolent Phillip. Porthos  is entirely fed up with aging and is constantly thinking of ways to end his sorry life, but never acts upon it.  Aramis has become a devout Jesuit who masterminds the switch of the Princes. Athos a devoted father, whose son Raoul, a besotted soldier, has become caught up in a love triangle with the beautiful Christine and none other than Louis himself, must avenge the murder of said son by Louis. And D’Artangnan, ever steady and loyal to his beloved friends, lover, and King, is in great conflict with the overthrow plot and the ensuing threat to his friends.

This mish-mash of literary and film versions does not offer any great or awe-inspiring social commentary or profound message, but it doesn’t lack in action, love, valor and great story telling. 

#4 The Man Who Would Be King (1975) directed by John Huston, starring Sean Connery, Michael Caine and Christopher Plummer.

Again, another fabulous cast. This movie was based upon a novella written by Rudyard Kipling in 1888. The story is about Danny Dravot and Peachy Carnehan, rouge non-commission British officers of the Indian Army who decide to resign from the army and set off for Kafiristan (somewhere in Afghanistan) – a land where no white man has set foot since Alexander the Great. They are certain that if they can only get there, their dreams of Kingship, wealth, women and an easy life will be obtained.

They fight blizzards, avalanches and numerous bandits along the way. In one of their battles, Danny is struck by an arrow and is miraculously unharmed. The arrow sticks into a bandolier hidden beneath his jacket. The people of Kafiristan decide that Danny must be a god. He and Peachy go along with the ruse in hopes of fulfilling their dreams. But, as the old adage goes, “beware what you wish for.” The rest of the story depicts the pitfalls of power, greed and Illusions of Grandeur.

When I was in college I attempted to write an adaption of this story for the stage, but as you can imagine, it was a bit more than I could handle!

#3  It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) directed by Frank Capra, starring James Stewart and Donna Reed.

What Christmas season would not be complete without an annual viewing of this American masterpiece? It was nominated for five Oscars and has been recognized by the American Film Institute as one of the 100 best American films ever made. It was based on a story called “The Greatest Gift” written by Phillip Van Doren Stern in 1939 and privately published by the author in 1945. I wonder why? Could he not sell it? If so, those publishing houses made a big mistake! Self-pubbed authors, there’s hope yet for the big block-buster!

 If you haven’t seen it, which I cannot imagine that anyone has NOT seen this film, but there might be some,- it’s about George Bailey, a man in a small town who has constantly given up his dreams for the sake of others. When he learns that all of his efforts have culminated in bankruptcy, George is ready to end it all. His dramatic suicide attempt of jumping from an ice covered bridge into frigid waters is thwarted by an angel named Clarence who has come from Heaven in the hopes of obtaining his wings. Clarence shows George what life in the community would be like without him and his sacrifices. Of course that life is bleak and heart -breaking, and George is finally convinced that the world is a better place with him in it.

Clarence is successful in saving George, thus obtaining his wings, and George returns to his life with renewed happiness and appreciation. This is a story about focusing on what you have, not what you want. A good lesson for everyone.

Clarence:  Strange isn’t it? Each man’s life touches so many other lives, when he isn’t around he leaves an awful hole, doesn’t he?”  “Remember George, no man is a failure who has friends. P.S. Thanks for the wings!”

#2 To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) starring (dreamy) Gregory Peck, Robert Duvall and Mary Badham (as Scout)

This American favorite was made from Harper Lee’s novel, published in 1960. The novel was an instant success and won the Pulitzer Prize. In 2003 the American Film Institute named Atticus Finch the greatest movie hero of the 20th century. Who could argue? Wouldn’t you want Atticus Finch as your  lawyer, neighbor, husband or dad? Peck’s stoic portrayal of the controversial home-town hero is moving beyond words.

The story was based upon Lee’s observations of her family and neighbors during an event that happened in her small town when she was ten years old. It is a gothic story with the primary themes involving racial injustice and the destruction of innocence. It also addresses issues of class warfare, courage and gender roles of the deep South. From the view point of Scout, Atticus’s six year old daughter, the story unfolds about a black man who is accused of raping a white woman.  Atticus, a lawyer and man of honor, integrity, and strong convictions, agrees to defend him which causes mayhem in the small, fictional Alabama town.

Scout and her brother Jem also learn a life’s lesson in their dealings with the reclusive Boo Radley, a neighbor, who terrifies them and fascinates them at the same time. He is never seen outside but often leaves small tokens and gifts for the children in a nearby tree. Fueled by their imaginations, Boo, in their minds, is someone horrible and evil, but they soon learn that he is immensely brave and kind. This subplot of misconception, misunderstanding and prejudice dovetails beautifully with the main plot.

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view. . . you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.” Atticus Finch

#1 Dead Poet’s Society (1989) directed by Peter Weir, starring Robin Williams.

The screen play was written by Tom Schulman based on his life at the Montgomery Bell Academy in Nashville, Tennessee. Dead Poet’s won the Best Screenplay Academy Award in 1989. I had the great pleasure of once meeting Mr. Schulman at a Santa Barbara Screen Writers meeting. I don’t think he remembers the occasion quite as well as I do!

The movie is about English teacher John Keating who returns to his alma mater, the conservative and aristocratic Welton Academy in Vermont, 1959.  It is Keating’s ambition to inspire his students through is teaching of poetry in unconventional ways. His methods include, having his students call him “O Captain my Captain,” referencing the poetry of Walt Whitman. He also regularly takes them out of the classroom and meanders throughout the school instilling in them the idea of Carpe Diem, or living life to the fullest. “Carpe Diem. Seize the day boys. Make your lives extraordinary.” He shocks and astonishes his students when he has them rip out the introduction of one of their books he thinks ridiculous, and has them stand on their desks to “see the world in a different way.”

This movie is an English Major’s dream. It’s full of references to the beloved classics we all studied and lost sleep over in preparation for numerous essays and discussions. It’s also aesthetically pleasing with a particularly surreal scene shot in slow motion of the boys escaping at night through the dense forest to start their own version of Keating’s former literary club, The Dead Poet’s Society.

“No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.” John Keating

 

And with that wonderful sentiment, I wish you all Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and many visits to the magical world of movie-land!

               

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What Do You Need In A Work Space?

Posted by: Kari Bovee on Sep 30 2012, 5:00 am in , , ,

What do you need in a work space to feel comfortable and get those creative juices flowing? Natural light? A comfy chair? Things neatly organized and in their place? These are some of the things that are essential to me. It took me awhile to figure out just what it was I needed.  My first office was set up in my daughter’s room after she left home. It wasn’t as bright as I liked and it was still . . . Jessica’s room. I suppose it will always be her room – not my office. I tried a sunnier spot in the house – the living room where a beautiful antique desk resides. While I loved the spaciousness of the desk, and the flood of sunshine streaming through the french doors,  there were always distractions:

The dogs outside the glass door, their happy faces begging, “come play with us!”

The refrigerator right around the corner.

The food pantry next to it. (It’s amazing how those two beckon when I’m trying to write!)

The TV.

I finally settled on “The Zen Room.” This was once a patio off the master bedroom that was converted (poorly) into a hot tub room before we moved in. We tossed the ancient hot tub, put up dry wall, and added beautiful windows. When we first renovated the house, this room would be the “exercise room” complete with Yoga mats, a treadmill and plenty of UV light. However . . . the room never got used. I started taking Yoga classes at a nearby gym. I ride horses and play tennis and relish the fact that these activities keep me outside. And really, who wants to use a treadmill? Don’t get me wrong, I have the utmost respect for folks that do – I just don’t have that kind of attention span!

So – the Zen Room became my office. I purchased a swanky glass and metal desk and a nice cushy chair. Don’t underestimate the importance of a comfortable chair! I used to write while sitting on a straight backed wooden kitchen chair. Why do we do things like that to ourselves? No wonder I could only sit there for 30 minutes at a time while my poor back screamed in protest. I also have a sweet little armchair for reading and relaxation. Unfortunately, the cats have taken possession. As you can see, Louise (of Thelma and Louise) is comfortably napping on a manuscript cushioned by a pillow.                                                                                         

 

The ribbons and trophies you see are not writing awards. (Alas!) They are horse showing awards. While they once resided in a plastic storage container, I decided to hang the most important ones along the long wall of my office. I wanted to be surrounded by my accomplishments. As most of you know, the writing business is rife with criticism and rejection. While we are supposed to take it like a champ, rise above it and work even harder, sometimes it sucks. A lot of times it sucks. Every once in a while we need to be reminded of our successes – even if they have nothing to do with our masochistic yet preferred craft.

I can happily say I love spending time in my work space. It’s too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter, but with an oscillating fan and a space heater, those problems are remedied. The cats think it’s their room, but luckily they are willing to share. Whether I am staring into space in an attempt to come up with ideas for new stories or diligently at work on a story in progress, my work space is conducive to creativity and long hours in the comfy chair.

What do you need in a work space? Please share your thoughts!

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A Day in the Life

Posted by: Samantha Ann King on Sep 15 2012, 7:42 pm in , , , ,

 

 

 

6:00 Stagger out of bed. Getting an early start. Only 243 words yesterday. Need to WRITE 1000 today.

 6:30 Turn on computer. While computer boots up, eat breakfast, insert caffeine drip, read paper and listen to news. Newspaper headline: “Ponzi Schemer Indicted.” Morning show anchor interviews philanthropist. Story idea: What if Ponzi hero funneled ill-gotten gains to food banks? Hmm. What if the daughter of one of his clients is out to get him but then learns of his philanthropy? Note to self, RESEARCH further.

 7:30 Do breakfast dishes. Start load of laundry. Consider vacuuming but must to WRITE.

  8:00 NETWORK Check email, Facebook, Twitter. Deliver some pithy remarks. Retweet interesting articles with #amwriting. Tweak website. Check Klout score. NETWORK more to raise score.

  10:00 WRITE . . . one sentence. Oh God, this is sooo hard. Maybe if I took it outside. Sunshine = vitamin D = energy = creativity. Plus fewer distractions, e.g. vacuum cleaner. Yeah. Definitely need to move it outside. Borrow kiddo’s laptop. Battery is dead. Search for plug. While laptop boots up, pull weeds and scoop poop.

  11:00 Fingers poised over keyboard ready to WRITE. Oh, wow, look at that woodpecker. I wonder what kind of woodpecker that is. Hurry inside to get bird book from shelf stuffed with RESEARCH books. Flip through it. Hmm, did it have stripes? I really need binoculars to do this right. Ignore vacuum sitting in corner because I am going to WRITE as soon as I identify this bird. Take book and binoculars outside. Woodpecker gone.

  11:30 WRITE half sentence. Lunch time. I’m starving. This will go much better on a full stomach. Prepare healthy salad for lunch. While eating delicious, healthy salad, watch last night’s TV. This is an efficient use of time because I can skip the commercials. It’s also considered RESEARCH because I can analyze dialogue.

  12:30 Hmm, it’s too hot to WRITE outside. Move it all inside. Ignore vacuum.

  1:00 Back in office, ready to WRITE.

  1:01 Email alert. Time to donate blood. Make appointment online. Hmm. Ponzi book black moment. Hero and heroine are donating blood. Bloodmobile blows up. They are the only survivors. RESEARCH phlebotomy.

  2:00 WRI—Oh, wait. RESEARCH Ponzi schemes. Food banks. Lawyers.

  4:00 Already?! Panic. READ and REVISE last chapter of manuscript. This will make that blank page easier to WRITE.

  5:10 Wow, that last chapter sucked. I’m the world’s worst writer. I need to go exercise. That will clear my mind, release endorphins, make it easier to WRITE.

  5:15 Go to gym. While working out on elliptical, read new book to RESEARCH market. Hero is Ponzi schemer who steals from the rich and gives to the poor. Heroine is lawyer out to nail him. My idea!!! She stole my idea!!! Skip to end of book. No bloodmobile bomb, but the hero dies. Throw eReader across gym. Ooops.

  6:15 Back home. Order new eReader.

  6:20 Too tired and sweaty to WRITE. Fix dinner. Eat with family. NETWORK on Facebook. Figure today’s word count—62. (At lease I didn’t allow vacuum to seduce me away from writing.) Tweet about how hard it is to WRITE.

  9:00 Go to bed early so I will get up earlier tomorrow and WRITE more.

  Disclaimer: This is a work of fiction. Characters, birds, salads, books, and incidents are the products of the author’s imagination. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual salads, birds, or events is purely coincidental.

Samantha Ann King was born and raised in Houston,Texas. After receiving her BBA in Finance from Texas A&M University and marrying her high school crush (notice she didn’t say sweetheart), Samantha relinquished her “native Texan” status and moved to Baton Rouge where she taught aerobics and weightlifting. She has called Albuquerque, New Mexico home since 1985. The mother of three has volunteered in the community as an advocate for children’s issues ranging from education to healthcare. In 2010, as her nest started to empty, she began writing erotic romance. Thanks to her win in Passionate Ink’s Stroke of Midnight Contest, Samantha signed her first publishing contract in 2011. Sharing Hailey was released by Carina Press in July 2012.

  Learn more about Samantha at www.SamanthaAnnKing.com.

 

 

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Ch-Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

Posted by: Samantha Ann King on Jul 8 2012, 1:00 am in , , ,

Two years ago, a friend of mine gave me this purple coneflower for my **th birthday. I kept it in its original pot for a couple of months, but it didn’t seem to like it there. It wasn’t growing. Still, it was so small–only two leaves–I worried it wouldn’t survive if I planted it in my garden. Obviously, it hasn’t just grown but has thrived. It loves its new digs.

I was in a hole on that particular birthday – a really deep, dark hole. I’d spent twenty-odd years as a stay-at-home-mom. My son was in college, my daughter in high school, and I desperately needed to figure out what to do with the rest of my life. There was other stuff going on, but at the crux of it all,  I’d stopped growing. Worse, I was afraid of the changes I needed to make to restart that growth.

No, not just afraid. Terrified!

At the half century mark, I was contemplating what I wanted to be when I grew up. I kept coming back to writing. But even as I kept coming back to it, I kept rejecting it—as editors and agents had rejected me when my children were young and I’d taken pen to paper . . . or fingertips to keyboard. I knew how difficult the writing life was. I knew better writers than I who’d been working at it for twenty years and still hadn’t published. I knew the odds of selling were about as good as winning the lottery, and unfortunately, not nearly as lucrative.

Yes, I’m exaggerating the odds part, but that’s what writers do. Because as it turns out, I am a writer. I can’t not write. Letters, emails, opinion pieces, and stories. Every little thing I write, I pour my soul into. So one day two years ago, I made a deal with myself. If I sat down at the computer every day for five days a week and wrote, and if I did this for a whole year, I would acknowledge that I’m a writer. And maybe in a couple of years, I’d start submitting.

Things went fairly smoothly. In six months I had a novel. I entered it in a contest and started the next novel. That’s when the plan went off course and the changes got really scary. Because the editor who judged the contest wanted to publish my novel. Okay, back to terrifying. I didn’t know anything about the business. I’d been writing, not learning about publishers and contracts and marketing. And could I make the revisions the editor wanted? Could I complete another book? The second wasn’t going as smoothly as the first. I even considered not signing the contract. In my braver moments, I told myself that life was supposed to be like this. You challenge yourself. Deep breath. You meet that challenge. Deep breath. You move on to the next one.

Thanks to those deep breaths and some fabulous LERA members, I met those challenges and moved on to the next one. It’s still scary. Some days are great. Others, not so much. But like my coneflower, I’m not just growing. I’m thriving.

 Samantha Ann King’s debut novel, Sharing Hailey, will be released on July 9 by Carina Press. You can connect with Samantha on Facebook and Twitter.

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Struggling With Type A

Posted by: Kari Bovee on Jun 10 2012, 6:00 am in , ,

Why aren’t there more hours to a day? Could we please extend the week to nine days? Just think of what we could accomplish. It would be so much easier to get the household chores done, grocery shop, take care of the kids, finish the laundry, work our day jobs, work out, have hobbies, blog endlessly, stay active on social networks and, oh yeah, finish that novel (or novels).  If we had that kind of time we would be much more effective and we’d be able to set even more goals. Does this sound like you?

You might be struggling with Type A.  First, I must state that I am not a psychologist, nor am I an expert in psychological behavior or theory.  The words you are about to read are in no way based in science, psychology or fact.  Just a little research on the internet. 

Since originally published in the 1950’s, The Type A and Type B personality theory, although controversial in the medical and science communities since its publication, still persists as a way of describing personality types.

The general characteristics for Type A include: impatience, taking on numerous tasks, obsessive with time management, competitiveness, intolerance for tardiness, wordiness or anything  they feel is wasting their time, irritability, and a tendency to be a “workaholic.” They are also proactive, ambitious, caring, truthful, and always try to take care of others.

Type B characteristics include: apathy, lacking organization, poor time management and procrastination.  On the positive side they are patient, relaxed, easy going, have little or no stress in their lives and reap the benefits of better health.

The Type A has a constant sense of time urgency.  There is never enough time to complete the monumental task they’ve created for themselves, because there is another waiting to be conquered just around the corner.  When a challenge has been met or perhaps even an award given, the Type A will revel in the moment, celebrate, and then move on to the next big achievement, because perhaps it can top the last. 

And speaking of challenges – everything is a challenge.  Conquering challenges and achieving goals helps relieve the insecurities that drive Type A’s to be the way they are.

The Type A personality is known to successfully handle many tasks at once.  They are usually involved in several unrelated activities while performing all of them well.  After all, failing is not an option.  Restlessness is a common anxiety suffered by the Type A.  If they aren’t doing something, they might feel guilty or become depressed. Life is out there to be lived and Type A has to do it all.

Competitive by nature, Type A personalities often engage in highly competitive sports and/or activities.  While competing against others for that prize or accolade, their fiercest opponent is themselves.  There is always the challenge to be better.  This may be treading into the waters of perfectionism, but I’m proposing that the Type A and the Perfectionist are kissing cousins.

Having said all this, I have to confess – I struggle with Type A. Sometimes I fantasize about sitting on a beach with a cocktail and letting the day lazily slip by, but when I am at the beach I’m good for about two hours.  Enough relaxation already.  Let’s get something done.

While sitting at the stop light, which seems interminable, my mind is racing with all I have to do for  the next few hours and that usually works its way into the next day. And, damn it, the light has been green for at least ten seconds. Why hasn’t that bozo moved forward yet?

And then there’s the schedule.  Certain things have to be done early in the day and certain things done in the afternoon.  After those are accomplished, there’s the shopping, laundry, and general upkeep of the house.  Oh, and lunch with friends, and then there’s that tennis match, and is it Sunday night? Mad Men is on, but maybe I should TiVo it because chapters seven and eight really need those revisions.  Darn, I did commit to critiquing two chapters for my critique buddy, and I scheduled myself for that weekly blog.

Does this sound familiar?  What’s a Type A to do? 

Sometimes we just need to STOP.  After that tennis match, maybe hang around and have lunch with the girls.  What about going to a movie in the middle of the day?  What if we decided to revise chapters seven and eight tomorrow?  Promise to NOT log onto the computer for the entire afternoon.  What about reading one book in its entirety instead of three at a time?   After all, it gets hard to keep the stories straight. Spend time with family just talking. Sometimes after a hard morning of working horses, I just sit and watch them eat grass.  Play with the dogs. Veg.

We need to be kind to ourselves and stop putting endless amounts of pressure on ourselves to constantly achieve.  We need to embrace the Type B lurking somewhere in our psyche.  For me, it’s a daily struggle, but I only have one mind, one body and one life and I want to enjoy it. So, I think I’ll go have that glass of wine and watch the sunset.

But, there’s that next book I wanted to research . . .

 

Kari Bovee -Writer of Historical Mysteries, Equestrian, Time Traveler

Website: www.Karibovee

Find me on Facebook, Twitter and LinkdIn

 

 

               

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